Hanover

From the street, the Hanover Friends meetinghouse reflects its origins as a private residence near the Dartmouth College campus.
From the street, the Hanover Friends meetinghouse reflects its origins as a private residence near the Dartmouth College campus.
Friends typically arrive and leave at the back of the house, which includes new additions.
Friends typically arrive and leave at the back of the house, which includes new additions.
Advertisements

Seabrook

Seabrook's 1701 meetinghouse
Seabrook’s 1701 meetinghouse. Friends would have been scandalized by the Christmas decorations.

The Seabrook meetinghouse was moved to Hampton Falls, New Hampshire, where it became a private residence. The central chimney is a later addition.

Dover 1-2-3

Dover Meeting resulted from the turbulent visiting ministry of three women in 1662. Despite severe persecution and banishment, they nevertheless returned to the community — soon abetted by more vocal Quakers — and convinced about a third of the population to join with the Society of Friends in spite of the political and social consequences to themselves and their families.

For the first decades, the local Quakers worshiped in members’ homes and farms.

The first meetinghouse was built about 1680 on Dover Neck, just south of the present St. Thomas Aquinas high school and probably just north of the Pinkham family cemetery. The burial ground contains a number of Quaker-style gravestones, some in a thicket behind the maintained section.

100_7878
The first Friends meetinghouse likely stood just to the north. Pinkhams were among the members of meeting.
100_7888
Some headstones are seen in the thicket behind the maintained section. The view looks toward the likely site of the first meetinghouse.

A second meetinghouse was erected in 1712 near the present corner of Locust and Silver streets, and Dover Friends worshiped in both buildings as a matter of convenience until a third meetinghouse was constructed in 1768. That large structure was likely raised in a single day, the way Amish barns are today, and the two smaller houses were then sold. The first went to Eliot, Maine, where it continued use for Friends worship.

The second meetinghouse is now a private residence on Spring Street, where it was moved, likely in the 1830s.
The second meetinghouse is now a private residence on Spring Street, where it was moved, likely in the 1830s.
The 1768 meetinghouse is still in use.
The 1768 meetinghouse is still in use.

Henniker

100_0969
The 1790 Quaker meetinghouse in Henniker, New Hampshire, sits in a remote corner of the town. It is officially known as Weare Monthly Meeting. The windows at the right were extended to give a woman pastor more light when she resided in that side of the house. In winter, Friends are warmed by a wood-fired stove as they worship.

 

Lee

The Quaker meetinghouse in Lee, New Hampshire, doubled as a schoolhouse. Now a private residence, it was adjacent to the Cartland homestead, believed to be a stop on the Underground Railway.
The Quaker meetinghouse in Lee, New Hampshire, doubled as a schoolhouse. Now a private residence, it was adjacent to the Cartland homestead, a stop on the Underground Railway whisking slaves to freedom.
Moses Cartland was an influential educator and a founder of the Republican Party. He was the best friend of his first-cousin, John Greenleaf Whittier, who visited often. The stone was erected by former students.
Moses Cartland was an influential educator and a founder of the Republican Party. He was the best friend of his first-cousin, John Greenleaf Whittier, who visited often. The stone was erected by former students.
The farmhouse sits to across the road from the meetinghouse, right. The view is from the Cartland family burial ground.
The large farmhouse, hidden in the woods, sits across the road from the meetinghouse, right. The view is from the Cartland family burial ground.